NYC DNA Lab Undertakes Huge Review for Potentially Mishandled Evidence

The NYC medical examiner’s office, responsible for processing DNA crime scene evidence, is reviewing the evidence from more than 800 rape cases after it was discovered a technician may have mishandled samples. According to the NY Times, that technician no longer works for the lab, but her impact is having far-reaching effects. Continue reading “NYC DNA Lab Undertakes Huge Review for Potentially Mishandled Evidence”

Harlem Drug Gangs Fractured By Arrests

Two gangs that circled the Robert F. Wagner Houses projects in Harlem have been “brought down” in a series of arrests, according to the New York Times. The gangs had set up shop in the projects, selling drugs on the playgrounds and in entryways. They allegedly used the community center to “divide their proceeds.” Now, though, officials say residents of the area can feel a little safer. Continue reading “Harlem Drug Gangs Fractured By Arrests”

New NY State Office to Review Possible Wrongful Convictions

The Conviction Review Board, created by New York State attorney general Eric T. Schneidermann marks the first law enforcement effort at examining questionable convictions in the state. According to the NY Times, the new board will address possible wrongful convictions, working on the leads of several senior lawyers lead by one assistance attorney general. Continue reading “New NY State Office to Review Possible Wrongful Convictions”

“Stop and Frisk” Protesters Arrested

Last week hundreds of protesters took to the streets in NYC and this time it wasn’t about Occupying Wall Street. Instead, these protesters were there to speak out against the city’s Stop-and-Frisk policies. Over 30 people were arrested, including some pretty notable names. Despite their anger at the program, Mayor Bloomberg stands behind the practice and credits it with driving the crime rate down in the city. Continue reading ““Stop and Frisk” Protesters Arrested”

Former NYPD Detective Admits Fabricated Drug Charges Against Innocent People Were Common

In an agreement with prosecutors, former NYPD narcotics detective Stephen Anderson a testified in court that numerous officers and even supervisors in the division he worked for would set up innocent people in order to make arrest quotas. Charged with planting cocaine on four men in a Queens bar, Anderson admitted he was trying to help our a fellow narcotics detective who’s numbers had been low. Continue reading “Former NYPD Detective Admits Fabricated Drug Charges Against Innocent People Were Common”

New York Judges Acquit More Often than Juries

According to a report from the Wall Street Journal this week, cases brought before judges are more likely to end in a “not guilty” verdict than those heard by juries. The decision to opt for a jury trial is one made by the defendant in a case and is not made hastily. The factors that go into a decision like this, no doubt have an effect on whether or not an acquittal is reached. Continue reading “New York Judges Acquit More Often than Juries”